Holešovice-Karlín Ferry Returns to Prague’s Vltava

Photo: Facebook / Přívoz Praha 7 Holešovice Karlín HolKa

Say you’re at the popular Pražská tržnice in Holešovice and you need to get to Karlín. You can see it right across the river. Unfortunately, there isn’t a bridge in sight.

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The journey could take you up to half an hour by traditional public transport, depending on the time of day, or around 45 minutes to walk a few kilometers even though your destination is just a stone’s throw away.

Thankfully, Prague’s Department of Public Transportation came up with a well-received solution a couple of years back: a 5-minute ferry ride that brings passengers from the banks of Prague 7 to Prague 8, and vice versa.

The ferry doesn’t run during the winter months, but due to popular demand it will run once again in 2017. The inaugural ferry ride will take place on Friday, March 24, and a include a special opening ceremony.

From 17:00 – 21:00 on Friday, visitors can ride the ferry for free during special guided tours that will take 15-20 minutes.

From Saturday, March 25, the ferry will resume normal operation. Riders with a valid transport pass can ride just as they would the metro or tram in Prague, and single-use 24 CZK tickets can also be used or purchased on the spot.

The ferry can be boarded from either the banks of Holešovice in front of Pražská tržnice, or in Karlín behind the Danube House office complex. A stop in-between the two at Štvanice island is aso possible.

Because of the journey from Holešovice to Karlín, the ferry is affectionately referred to as HolKa, which means ‘girl’ in Czech.

More information can be found at HolKa’s very own Facebook page.

Daniel Lee

Daniel Lee

The versatile Danny Lee has been living in Prague and writing about the Czech capital for the past 15 years. You've probably read his work in the past without even knowing it.
Daniel Lee
About Daniel Lee 291 Articles
The versatile Danny Lee has been living in Prague and writing about the Czech capital for the past 15 years. You've probably read his work in the past without even knowing it.